The rise and fall of Teresa May

This is not on the topic of the Middle East but it is topic I am interested in and write about. Here is today's writing.


The rise and fall of Teresa May, as displayed in her body language

Teresa May, Britain's former Prime Minister, swooped into Downing Street on 13 July 2016 a proud and confident woman, taking over from David Cameron, as leader of the Conservative Party and Prime Minister. She walked tall, stood erect and had a distinguished track record in politics, having been Home Secretary from 2000 to 2016 and MP for Maidenhead since 1997.

How could such a proud and tough woman, who used her height to her advantage, be forced out as Prime Minister? How could the public view her as weak and frail, often seen as a poor negotiator?

Her body language changed during her time in office. At 1.72cm tall (only 0.3cm less than the current Prime Minister, Boris Johnson) her height had been a positive asset but this changed- along with the public's perception of her. She developed a stoop, which is never good, and is often seen as a protective posture. Sometimes her neck even shrank, like a crab getting into her shell, and illustrative of someone who is scared.

Another way to look at it is to compare May's posture with that of a tramp. Tramps often stoop whilst bouncers project their chest to ward others off. In terms of body language, what May really needed was a balance between these two.

May did look vulnerable at the end, best shown by her slump and her shoulders rising. Her lack of emotion, for which she was heavily criticised, was covered up by a lot of fake smiles. (In this respect, the eyes are a give-away portraying how genuine smiles are. Fake smiles are usually made to disguise a negative emotion).

As soon as May looked vulnerable, as displayed by her posture, this was the end of her tenure.

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Saturday, 24 August 2019