How the energy market shapes the Middle East and South and Central Asia

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Energy strategist, Mohamad Kharkan, discusses the issues that effect the Middle East energy market. This is the final article in the series.

Syria is involved and is directly linked to the religious wars and conflicts between Shiites and Sunnis, primarily with the Nabucco and South Stream schemes mentioned in the previous article.

In 2011, a project called the "Islamic Pipeline" was launched by three Shiite countries: Iran, Iraq and Syria. The pipeline would transport Iranian gas to the Mediterranean for the purpose of supplying energy to Europe, avoiding Turkish territory. The plan should allow Iran to transport its gas to Europe, while also building a network to Lebanon, which French historian, Roland Lombardi, said would eventually connect to the South Stream network. It should be noted that Iran was the main reserve that would feed the Nabucco plan, but Iran was immediately removed for political reasons. The overthrow of the Iranian regime, either through military violence or through the seeds of revolution, was the intention.

Another plan was launched. This time it was a Sunni country that received a Pentagon guarantee. Qatari gas to feed Europe must be piped from Qatar to Saudi Arabia, then to Syria, and finally to Turkey. The plan also reactivated Nabucco. The Nabucco project had the support of Turkey and the US. The proposed pipeline had been shut down due to a lack of credible gas suppliers.  Of course, the implementation of the Qatar gas plan would be impossible if the regime of Bashar al-Assad is not overthrown and replaced by a submissive government. At this time that we witnessed the military forces of the Quds Force of Iran, under the command of Sardar (known as Qasem) Soleimani, established a military camp in Syria and Lebanon during the Defenders of the Shrine project.

With such a perspective on various gas projects, it is possible to gain a deeper understanding of some countries' insistence on overthrowing Bashar al-Assad's regime and supporting the so-called Syrian opposition, as well as Iran's support for Bashar al-Assad's government

So the key point of competition between gas producers is the EU, a market where gas consumption is rising.

More than ever, there will be activity in the Mediterranean as new players enter the market. Israel and Cyprus have discovered huge gas reserves off their coasts, and they will become important exporters in the medium term. We will see that the UAE, which has the lowest share and the largest investments in the region's energy market, being is a tough competitor to Qatar. In this regard, it is creating a plan.

Abraham makes a covenant with Israel.

In the eastern Mediterranean, gas reserves have been discovered off the coast, allowing Lebanon and Syria to exploit them. The US is advocating for a gas pipeline network to feed Europe and pass through Turkey. Pressure on Israel has begun. The Russians prefer to transport liquefied natural gas (LNG) to industrial Asia via liquefied natural gas carriers.

The great energy game is accelerating. Several energy and civilization plans are clashing, showing their political and strategic ambitions.

Another plan was launched. This time a Sunni country received a Pentagon guarantee. Qatari gas would feed Europe and must be piped from Qatar to Saudi Arabia, then to Syria, and finally to Turkey. The plan also reactivated Nabucco. The Nabucco project had the support of Turkey and the US, and had been shut down due to a lack of credible gas suppliers. Of course, the implementation of the Qatar gas plan would be impossible if the regime of Bashar al-Assad is not overthrown or is replaced by a submissive government. It was at this time that we witnessed the military forces of the Quds Force of Iran, under the command of Sardar (known as Qasem) Soleimani, establish a military camp in Syria and Lebanon during the Defenders of the Shrine project.

With such a perspective on various gas projects, it is possible to gain a deeper understanding of some countries' insistence on overthrowing Bashar al-Assad's regime and supporting the so-called Syrian opposition as well as Iran's support for Bashar al-Assad's government. The key point of competition between gas producers is the EU, a market where gas consumption is rising.

More than ever, there will be activity in the Mediterranean as new players enter the market. Israel and Cyprus have discovered huge gas reserves off their coasts, and they will become important exporters in the medium term. In the future, we will see that the UAE, which has the lowest share and the largest investments in the region's energy market, as well as being is a tough competitor to Qatar, is creating a plan to beat the competition. 

Abraham makes a covenant with Israel.

In the eastern Mediterranean, gas reserves have been discovered off the coast, allowing Lebanon and Syria to exploit them. The US is advocating for a gas pipeline network to feed Europe and pass through Turkey. Pressure on Israel has begun. The Russians prefer to transport liquefied natural gas (LNG) to industrial Asia via liquefied natural gas carriers.

The great energy game is accelerating. 
US gives $165 million to Yemen
Why the Middle East energy market is so complicate...
 

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Friday, 24 September 2021